Agile Security: Balancing Security with the Need for Agility written by Jeff Lowder

Jeff Lowder

Jeff Lowder is an information security executive with a passion for innovation in information risk management, with an exceptionally strong background in IT governance, inductive logic, and decision theory as it relates to risk analysis and risk management. He has over 14 years of management experience and 17 years of IT experience that span risk management, Internet security, strategic planning, incident response, compliance, information systems audit, business continuity planning, and project management.

He is the President of the Society for Information Risk Analysts, which is devoted exclusively to continually improving the practice of information risk analysis, and Director, Global Information Security for OpenMarket. His previous assignments include Director, Information Security / Risk Management at Disney Interactive Media Group, a branch of The Walt Disney Company; Sr. Security Architect / Manager, Network Security at NetZero; Director, Security and Privacy at Elemica; and Director, Network Security at the United States Air Force Academy, where he was named Information Protection Individual of the Year.

He has been published in multiple editions of the HANDBOOK OF INFORMATION SECURITY MANAGEMENT (ed. Harold F. Tipton and Mikki Krause, Auerbach Publications). He is a member of the ISSA and the Society for Risk Analysis. A graduate of Seattle Pacific University, with a B.S. degree in Computer Science, Lowder also is a Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) and has served on the boards of the Delaware Valley ISSA and the SANS Institute’s GSEC Certification Advisory Board.

How to Define “Connected Systems” to the PCI Cardholder Data Environment (CDE)

– While the Payment Card Industry (PCI) Data Security Standard (DSS) arguably does a better job than most standards in defining scope, there is one part of the DSS that needs to be clarified. The DSS determines scope in terms of “system components,” which it defines as follows. The PCI…

6 Theories of Probability and 6 Reasons Why They Matter to ISRA

– While probably everyone would agree that information security risk analysis (ISRA) is shot through with appeals to probability, very few non-academic discussions of ISRA provide any sort of rigorous analysis of what “probability” means. (See Alberts and Dorofee 2003 for a notable…

Why the “Risk = Threat x Vulnerability x Impact” Formula is Mathematical Nonsense — Part 2

– In my last post, I argued that security risk managers should stop using the “Risk = Threat x Vulnerability x Impact” formula (hereafter, the “R=TVC formula”), for two reasons. First, the variables “Threat” and “Vulnerability” are typically undefined; indeed,…

Decision Theory is the Foundation for Information Security Risk Management

– Disclaimer: I originally wrote the following text as a post to a mailing list in 2005, but it still seems applicable today. The more I read the writings of various information security professionals about information security risk analysis (ISRA), the more I’m struck by the following…

Reply to Jack Jones on the Meaning of “Risk”

– In a recent post to his blog, Jack Jones asks, “What’s ‘a risk’ anyway?” This is a great question, especially since a lot of people working in information security seem to use the word in a variety of ways, ways that often violate common usage among risk…